An Update and a Drawing from a Fan

Dear Reader,

I’m writing from the dregs of summer. The weather at the Warren has been in the mid- to upper-nineties for weeks, and there’s been very little rain. I’ve managed to keep the pumpkin patch watered, but there’s too much corn to spray. I went to check on my poor thirsty stalks this morning and saw, to my delight, silvery-green tassels bursting from a few of the crooks. That tells me the roots are getting enough water from the soil without my help, and it won’t be long before I see beautiful new ears of corn in the garden, drought or no drought. Why am I surprised?

That brings me to The Warden and the Wolf King. One could argue that I’m only writing this post because I’m procrastinating. Well, the corn in the garden reminds me that things take time, and grow at their own speed. I’m not procrastinating as much as percolating. I’m not ignoring the story–I’m waiting for it. The crazy part about writing a book is that a lot of the work is done not just when you’re banging words out on the computer, but when you’re doing the dishes, riding your bike, reading your bible, and eating dinner. On the other hand, no amount of thinking can take the place of banging words out. We plant the seeds, but God makes them grow. Spirit and flesh.

All that to say, I’m working on the new book. Can’t wait for you to read it.

I was tending to old emails this morning and found one from 12-year-old Maggie Rice, which included an excellent drawing of Chimney Hill that I wanted to share with you guys. Thanks for reading, Maggie! This picture is so good.

6 thoughts on “An Update and a Drawing from a Fan

  1. Thanks for the update. My newly-turned 10yo boy is dying to know the end of the story. I can update him now. We’ll wait for however long it takes to percolate!!!!!

  2. “The crazy part about writing a book is that a lot of the work is done not just when you’re banging words out on the computer, but when you’re doing the dishes, riding your bike, reading your bible, and eating dinner. On the other hand, no amount of thinking can take the place of banging words out. We plant the seeds, but God makes them grow. Spirit and flesh.”

    Yes, yes, yes! It is so often like this, in my own little writerly experience. I have to carry paper wherever I go to catch the ideas. And percolation is good. ^^

    My sibs and I are glad to hear that WatWK is in progress!!! :D

  3. Please don’t rush! These stories are too wonderful, and well worth waiting for. Let it percolate as long as it needs! In the wise words of Oskar N. Reteep, “There’s a time to think hard and there’s a time to ease up.”

  4. What? Not even a word count?! You’re going to have a reader riot on your hands, Mr. Peterson. There’s nothing worse than a gaggle of hungry readers who want to read your next book.

  5. I appreciated your word-picture, the correlation you drew between the corn in the fields and the story in your head. I have always felt just a little uneasy about the fact that I must, at times, let the story “percolate” – at times no amount of pushing and pulling and cajoling and coercing will make it come. At times it has to sprout only when it is ready – though God alone knows when that is. But you’re right: as with the corn, it is sometimes in the nature of a story to need a quiet spell underground before coming up. It feels good to hear another author say, “I’m not ignoring the story – I’m waiting for it.”

    And Maggie, splendid picture! It takes a braver soul than I to attempt such a display of stars; the glow around the moon, the light on the moonside of the hill and the shadowy grass on the left, the chimney-smoke – everything is wonderful. You have quite the eye for detail!

Leave a Reply